Paatz on the Bigallo I

Translated by Sonia Brozak, edited by Katherine Dau

Paatz, Walter and Elisabeth. Die Kirchen von Florenz: Ein kunstgeschichtliches Handbuch. Vol I: A-C. Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann, 1955. 378-391.

(#) refers to footnotes

Scroll further for transcribed original German

Bigallo I

Oratorio del…

Corner of Via dei Calzaiuoli and Piazza di S. Giovanni

Special Literature

P. Landini: Istoria dell’Oratorio di S. Maria del Bigallo e della ven. Compagnia della Misericordia, 1779 (cited as Landini, Bigallo).

Poggi-Ricci-Supino: “La Compagnia del Bigallo,” Rivista d’Arte. II, 1903, 189

Name

  1. Misericordia Vecchia (1).
  2. Oratorio della Misericordia Vecchia e Capitani del Bigallo (2)
  3. Oratorio del Bigallo; commonly, Bigallo (3). See note under Building History (around 1425).

Building History

Oratorio of the Bigallo (Corner of Via dei Calzaiuoli and Piazza di San Giovanni) (4).

The company of the Misericordia, a confraternity, acquired the building in 1321 (5). After they acquired the property through a donation of the adjoining plots in 1351, (6) they began construction of the building in 1352, which contained a loggia, an oratory, meeting hall, and a living room for the brothers of the confraternity (7). By 1358 the building process was completed (8). The design can be, in all likelihood, attributed to the architect Alberto Arnoldi, who also provided the most important three-dimensional fixtures (9).

In 1425, under the oversight of Cosimo de’Medici, the brotherhood of the Compagnia della Misericordia united with the original long-time resident of the building, the brotherhood of Santa Maria del Bigallo, jointly receiving the residence of the latter through a co-ownership agreement (10). Constructional changes were apparently not undertaken at that time. A fire in 1442 damaged the upper floor of the building (11). In 1452 the Sala dell’Udienza was expanded through the inclusion of a new room (12). Since the 1700s multiple disfiguring changes to the building were undertaken. In 1698 the arcade of the loggia and the window in the upper floor were walled up (13). After termination of the Bigallo’s management in 1776, the building was given as the site of the administration for the state orphanage and was altered significantly from its original configuration during the restoration (14). Walls were removed from the arcade of the loggia in 1865 and the interior of the oratory was restored then (15). In 1882 the walled-up windows on the upper floors were re-opened (16), and a final restoration took pace in 1904 (17).

Building Description

Old Descriptions.

• The fresco of Niccolò di Pietro Gerini, Restitution of Children, Sala de Consiglio

• The predella of Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio, high altar. In the Bigallo itself (see building facilities)

• Codex of Macro di Bartolommeo Rustici, mid 15th-century (Photo under the authority [soprintendenza] 7646)

• Cityscape by Stefano Bonsignori, 1584

• Illustrations by Mori-Boffito, Piante e Vedute di Firenze, 1926

• Drawing by E. Burci (before 1865)

• Exterior view of now walled-up loggia and the same windows

• Illustrations in Rivista d’Arte II, 1904, p. 244

Building images

• Elevation engraving from D. Callesi in Rohault de Fleury, Le Toscane au Moyenage, 1876

Exterior

The building abuts the neighboring houses to the south and west. Its northern façade included three niches, with one on the eastern wall. These and the eastern niche of the northern area were designed as a square loggia, which served as exhibition space for foundlings. The two round-arched openings of the porch were framed through two-story pilaster pairs and a cornice; a corresponding system of two-story pilasters and rounded arches were superimposed on two remaining bays in the north wall (18). Each of the bays was articulated with a pointed arch with broad architraves and striated frames; the last bay contained an arched window (19).

Above the ground floor pilasters articulate a mezzanine floor, in which naturalistic and picturesque decorations appear.

Also, the floor above is articulated by pilasters: on the north wall appear three boxes, one on the east wall; every one of these boxes contains a round arch combined with a bifurcated window. On the pilasters, the springing level of the windows are connected by a shelf and sit carved with volutes furnished by girders which protrude out and are supported by rafters.

The Loggia

By Alberto Arnoldi (see building history). A highlight of the lavish decorative style, Andrea Orcagna’s famous tabernacle in Orsanmichele would have been well known. Alberto Arnoldi, like Orcagna a sculptor-architect, had incorporated Orcagna’s style during the building’s development. The pillars stand on plinths made of marble slabs, which contain vivid, grooved quatrefoils; in each of the arcade’s openings stands another square marble slab with a rose window of individual work. The outer pilaster pairs are also adorned with quatrefoils; on the inner pillars and the arches the quatrefoils are somewhat bigger and contain half-length figures (see facilities). In the embrasures of the arcade are rotated, ornamental foliate pillars, which continue in the archivolt as a rotated bead molding. The flat pilasters against the arches are ornamented with molding strips; on their starting points appear flat corbels with leaf work (20).

The interior of the logger is simpler. The numerous bases run along the thin shelf, where there are also continuous pilasters. Between these are located wide niches, in which are lintels with decorated, screened pointed arches and quatrefoils. The niches are closed with rounded arches; between these arches and the pointed arched ribbed vaults emerge spandrels from each ornamental circle.

Interior

The oratory belonged to a rare type of large, arched, gothic churches, among them San Jacopo in Campo Corbolini, San Martino della Scala, and San Carlo Borromeo I. There were two pointed, overlaid, ribbed arches, supported by broad and flat, splayed corner panels that compose pilasters. The rose windows in the north wall were extended in 1865 at the same time that the arcade of the loggia had windows installed inside it.

Facilities

Exterior

The entrance hall contains the three-dimensional decorations that were designed by the architect Alberto Arnoldi, who was also a sculptor. These are presented as preserved gems of gothic building decoration, a rarity in Trecento Florence. The execution is often rough, as there were obviously assistants involved in their production. The end products were clearly based on an antiquated taste that derived from gothic prototypes, but were also independent of those traditional forms.

Entrance Hall In the quatrefoil of the inner pilaster pairs and the arches of the half-figures; eight prophets appear on the east side. In the vortex of the arcade we see the Man of Sorrows; on the north side are eight angels and the Savior. In the gusset of the arcade appear the four Cardinal Virtues, with Justice and Prudence placed on the north side and Wisdom and Temperance on the east side (21).

Assistants produced four pairs of masks with attached leaves that were placed in the niches and the embrasures on the interior of the loggia, close over the cornices.

Upper Floors on the North Side Over the loggia stand half life-sized figures produced by a Florentine sculptor in the second half of the 14th century: These stone sculptures represent the Madonna with Child, Saint Peter Martyr and Saint Lucy; (22). The three baldicchini from 1413 have been attributed to Filippo di Cristofano (23). Between these canopies appear frescoes of worshipping angels, probably produced around 1425 (25). In the middle bay sits a bust of the Madonna with Child by Alberto Arnoldi from 1361. Over the blind arcade on either side of the bays appear frescoes depicting Peter Martyr Presenting Banners to Twelve Followers of the Company of the Misericordia and The Miracles by the Preaching of Peter Martyr painted by Ventura di Moro and Russell di Jacopo Franchi in 1445/6; these were very badly destroyed during Gaetano Bianchi’s restoration in 1882 (26). The remaining paint – including the ornaments and the figures in quatrefoils – all came from the restoration of the 19th century.

Interior

Oratory

High altar: A carved tabernacle bears three niches, with the middle ornamentally flanked with two pillars and crowned by a spread architrave and round gables designed and executed by Nofero d’Antonio Noferi (1515) and gilded by Bernardo di Jacopo and Zanobi di Lorenzo (27). The three marble statues by Alberto Arnoldi feature the Madonna with Child and two candlestick—holding angels, all produced between 1359 and 1364 (28). The painted predella by Rodolfo del Ghirlandaio from 1515 contains five pictures: the Death of Saint Peter Martyr, the Birth of Christ, the Cloaked Misericordia, the Flight into Egypt, and the Burial of Tobit (Two Men Carrying a Body, with the Bigallo depicted in the background); (29). In the stained glass in the rose windows of the north wall appears the figure of Caritas, or Charity, from around 1865 (30).

Sala del Consiglio

(entrance at 1 Piazza di San Giovanni)

Wooden door. Inlay (coats of arms of the Brotherhood of the Bigallo and adornments), 1500s (31).

South wall. Removed fresco: Restitution of Children by Niccolò di Pietro Gerini and Ambrogio di Baldese, 1386. Originally on the façade; removed and demaged in 1777 (an inscription appears under the fresco) (32).

East wall. Frescoes, twelve scenes of the Tobit Legend, from the first quarter of the 1500s (33). Described from left to right, beginning above:

  1. Tobit and his son with a group of riders in front of the city.
  2. Banquet of Tobit; his son told him that he has found the body of an Israelite; Tobit leaves the dinner.
  3. The blind Tobit.
  4. Tobit sends his son on a trip.
  5. Marriage of the young Tobias to Sarah.
  6. Marriage feast.
  7. The archangel Raphael collects the debt from Gabael in the place of young Tobias.
  8. Raphael returns to the wedding feast.
  9. Journey home of the young Tobias.
  10. The dog welcomes his return.
  11. Homecoming.
  12. Banquet in the house of Tobit.

Over six additional scenes (see lost facilities)

West wall. Fresco, Misericordia, 1352 (?) (34). Large standing figure; on the coat appear medallions with sayings and small scenes dedicated to works of compassion. Beside these figures appear sayings which relate to the works of the Misericordia. At the feet kneel genuflecting figures of all ages and status, along with a depiction of Florence, the earliest known representation of the city (35).

The rooms of the upper floors are modernized and have been established as a museum. Descriptive lists in Rivista D’Arte II, 1904.

Lost Facilities

Exterior

Loggia. Grid from the Sienese Francesco Petrucci, 1358; lost (36).

North side. Tabernacle for the Madonna figure over the door, by Bonaiuto di Lando, 1387; painted by Ambrogio di Baldese; lost (37).

East side. Over the arcade of the loggia (?) (38). A fresco, the Abbott gives children, which have been passed off, back to their parents; by Niccolò di Pietro Gerini and Ambrogio di Baldese, 1386; now in the Sala del Consiglio, see above.

From undefined locations. Fresco, History of Saint Peter Martyr by Ventura di Moro and Rossello di Jacopo Franchi, 1445/46; lost (39). Frescoes by Pietro Chellini, 1444; lost (40). Paintings on the roof, by a painter named Bartolommeo, 1361; lost (41).

Interior

Oratory

Domed ceiling frescoes (also frescoes on the side walls) by Nardo di Cione, 1363 (42); destroyed or painted over in 1760. Second fresco decoration, 1760, vaults and side wall painted by Stefano Fabbrini; probably obscured in 1865 (43). Glass window by Stefano di Biagio dei Mezzi, 1454; lost (44).

First high altarpiece (?): Madonna with John the Baptist and Saint Peter Martyr; Christ in pediments, the preaching and the crests of the Brotherhood of the Bigallo, in the predella the Lamentation of Christ and also a scene from the legend of John the Baptist and Peter Martyr; by Mariotto di Nardo, 1415/16; perhaps removed in 1515 by the establishment of the high tabernacles; Main picture now in an American private collection, predella lost (45). Second, under the predella of the altar tabernacle from 1515, three larger and four smaller pictures:

  1. Raffael with Tobit
  2. Genuflecting Madonna and God the Father from worshipping angels, in addition to Adam and Eve (immaculate conception?)
  3. Writing woman (Sibyl?)
  4. Sybil
  5. Sybil
  6. Preaching
  7. Mary’s Assumption by Rodolfo del Ghirlandaio, 1515; lost (47).

Tabernacle. Issued on the feast day of Saint Peter Martyr; in wood, carved by Antonio Carota. On the interior wings appeared John the Baptist and Tobit, on the exterior were the arms of the Misericordia and the Bigallo, painted by Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio in 1510; On the interior of the tabernacle appeared a bronze relief of Peter Martyr, the base of which contained a relief depicting his martyrdom. Purchased in 1786; now missing (47).

Panel. Saint Peter Martyr presented with the banners of the Capitani della Fede; in the pediment the Madonna between Saints Francis and Domenic; on the backside of the pediment Christ in the grave, underneath an inscription, which refer to the founding of the Company; attributed to Jacopo di Cione, last quarter of the 1400s (48); now in the Museum of the Bigallo (49).

Sala del Consiglio

East Wall. Six frescoes with sevens from the Tobit Legend, first quarter of the 1500s, still visible (see under facilities); lost (50).

From undefined locations. Fresco or panel painting of the Bigallo’s founding by Agnolo Gaddi, 1380, with images of the founder Giovanni Buccheri; missing or lost (51). On further lost equipment, materials, and facilities, which are no longer in the established locations today, see the documents by Poggi, Rivista d’Arte II, 1904.

Notes

(1) As the building was named, before the Company of the Bigallo received joint ownership in 1425.

(2) Del Migliore, 1684

(3) Richa VII, 1785, 251. The name Bigallo is alleged to have derived from a hospital of this name by Ruballa (spedale di S. Maria a Fonteviva, named del Bigallo), that the Compagnia Maggiora della Vergine knew and then transferred from their residence; see Richa VII, 1758; research on G. Florenze IV, 1908, 426 and History of Florence II, 1908.

(4) The History of the Compagnia della Misericordia is often falsely described, where they are confused with the Compagnia del Bigallo, which existed separately until 1425. The Compagnia della Misericordia was first mentioned in documents around 1321 (see the following notes). According to the “Liber Chronicorum” by Saint Anthony (ed. Giunti 1486, Vol III, Part III, Chapter VII, p. 233) this confraternity would have arisen out of the 1292 founding of the Laudese Brotherhood from Orsanmichele; see Passerini, Stab., 1853, 446f., but this is an erroneous assumption, as the company was first mentioned in 1329. Other legendary founding stories are mentioned in the Illustrated Florence, 1847, 49ff. and by Passerini, Stab., 1853, 440 ff..

(5) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 194 note, after the Spogli Strozzi. Richa VII, 1758, 268 dated the donation of property by the early Baldinuccio Adimari, describing the houses from “around 1340.”

(6) Document from 9.16.1351 by Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 225/6; see also Passerini, Notes., 1853, 448.

(7) Document from 1.28.1352 (building beginning) by Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 226; unknown by Passerini, Note., 1853, 449/450.

(8) By this year, the grids of the loggia had already been manufactured; Document by Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 226.

(9) Vasari I, 302 named Nicola Pisano as the architect; he followed Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XIII. In contrast, Passerini (1853, 449-450) referred to chronological contradictions and argued that Andrea Orcagna was the architect. Burckhardt, Cicerone, 1860, 145 ascribed it to followers of Orcagna. Frey, Loggia de’Lanzi, 1885, 105 argued against the possibility that Orcagna would have been an influence to the architect of the Bigallo (Tabernacle in Orsanmichele). Frey also thought older components from the building could have been withdrawn; the structures of both western arcades and pilasters reminded him of the similar building styles seen in Santa Maria Novella and Santa Croce, and so he came to the conclusion that the rest of the old oratorio could have been constructed by Arnolfo di Cambio, the architect responsible for Santa Croce (Frey, ibid., 86, 105). In Contrast, Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 193/4 believed that the Brotherhood may well have resided in this location as early as 1321 (see Note 5) and that furthermore the construction planning allowed for no elimination of older parts. However, Poggi supported the first of Frey’s opinions, that Alberto Arnoldi had been the builder. Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 684 attributed the building to Arnoldi, under the influence of Orcagna; Thieme-Becker I, 1907, 218 concurred that Arnoldi was the architect of the Bigallo’s loggia, as did L. Beccherucci, Arte XXX 1927, 214.

(10) Del Migliore, 1684, 78; Richa VII, 1758, 267/268 after a writing for the 1700s; Illustrated Florence IV, 1839, 32; Passerini, Stab., 1853, 797; Poggi, Riv. d’A II, 1904, 192, 195. Further research in G. Florenz IV, 1908, 427 wrongly dated to 1452.

(11) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 197.

(12) Documents by Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 296.

(13) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 201 after a contemporary diary. This condition is described by Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XIV and reproduced in a drawing of E. Burci, illustrated by Poggi, ibid., 244.

(14) Poggi, Riv. d’A II, 1904, 202.

(15) Passerini, cur. stor. art. 91; Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 202; the works were managed by Mariano Falcini.

(16) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 202.

(17) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 202; A. e. st. XXIII, 1904, 155.

(18) As a precursor to these systems see San Giovannino dei Cavalieri.

(19) The windows were expanded in 1865; see Poggi, Riv. d’A II, 1904, 196.

(20) It is uncertain if the figures should stand there.

(21) The three dimensional decoration were attributed first by Frey, Loggia de’Lanzi, 1885, 105 to Alberto Aroldi; Poggi, Riv. d’A II, 1904, 193, presumed – with justification – that assistants also participated. See also M. Raymond, Gaz. B. A. II, 1893, 322 and Le sculpture florentine, 1897, I, 170f; Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 684; Thieme-Becker I, 1907, 218. (22) The three statues originate from the old oratory of the Brotherhood of the Bigallo (see Bigallo II) and were transferred there in 1425. They were painted by Ambrogio di Baldese in 1392, see Poggi, Riv. d’A II, 1904, 230/231 (Documents) and 192/193 – the attribution to Nicola Pisano stems from Vasari I, 302 and Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XIII: Milanesi-Vasari I, 302 corrected mistakes about the statues by producing documentation that mentioned them as the works of Filippo di Cristofano (1413); see also Swarzenski, Kunstgeschichte Anz. III, 1906, 15 and Vitzthum-Volbach, Die Malerei und Plastic des mittelalters in Italien, 1924, 165. Reymond, La sculpture florentine I, 1897, 171 who connected these sculptures stylistically with the works of Nino Pisano. Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 522: School of Nicola Pisano. (23) Documents by Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 2904, 230/231.

(24) Probably for the occasion of the installation of the figures painted in 1424 (see note 22) which were restored.

(25) Documents by Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 288; see also Supino ibid., p 231. Del Migliore 1684, 81: Andrea Pisano; Landini, Bigallo, 1779 XIV; La sculpture florentine I, 1897, 151, 170f.; Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 684; Valentiner, Art in America XVI, 1928, 269.

(26) Documents by Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 241/242: commissioned in 1445; estimated 1446 through Ghiberti and Buonaiuti di Giovanni. Del Migliore 1684, 81; Richa VII, 1758, 252, 285 (ostensibly by Taddeo Gaddi); falsely identified with work from Pietro Chellini (see lost facilities) by Rumorh, Ital. Forsch. II, 1827, 169 ff., Crowe-Cavalcaselle 11, 1864, 519 and A. e st. XXIII, 1905, 166 in opposition to Passerini, Cur. star. art. 97 and Del Pretorio di Firenze, 1865, 9. Venturi, Storia VII 1, 1911, 22; Thieme-Becker XII, 1916, 315. For more on the restoration, see Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 203.

(27) Documents by Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 228 - Vasari I, 485, falsely ascribed them to Antonio Carota; see also Del Migliore 1684, 81, Richa ViI, 1758, 283, Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVI; corrected by Milanesi-Vasari I, 485.

(28) Documents by Passerini, Stab., 1853, 453/454 and Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 226-228; the work was commissioned in 1349 and final payment delivered in 1364. Vasari I, 485 attributed it to Andrea Pisano; as did Del Migliore, 1684, 81, Richa VII, 1758, 282 and Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVI; see also Supino, Riv. d’A II, 1904, 212/213; Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 683f., 686; Thieme-Becker I, 1907, 218; Vitzthum-Volbach, Die Malerei und Plastic des Mittelalters in Italien, 1924, 171; Valentiner, Art in Am. XVI, 1928, 269.

(29) Documents by Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 230. Vasari VII, 358 attributed it to Rodolfo del Ghirlandaio; as did Del Migliore, 1684, 81 and Richa VII, 1758, 283; Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVII: by a son of Ghirlandaio. Thieme-Becker XIII, 1920, 562 (as Ridolfo); as well as Venturi, Storia IX, 1, 1925, 512; Berenson, Ital. pictures, 1932, 227: Ridolfo Ghirlandaio (?)

(30) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 186.

(31) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 204; Wackernagel, Der Lebensraum des Künstlers in der Florentinischen Renaissance, 1938, 169.

(32) Documents by Passerini, Stab., 1853, 456/457 and Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 229; on the early installation of the frescoes, see Facilities, exterior and note 38. A watercolor copy of the fresco was made around the time of the destruction of the painting that took place in 1777, see Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 209, Note 4- Del Migliore, 1684, 80; Richa VII, 1758, 293. This fresco is sourced to a document from 1444 falsely. – Poggi ibid., 208f.; Sirèn, Burl. Mag. 1909, 325 and Thieme-Becker XIII, 1920, 465: primarily from A. di Baldese; also van Marle III, 1924, 612, 617: the preserved parts have little connection to Niccolò di Pietro Gerini and could arguably come from Ambriogio di Baldese; the no longer preserved parts appear (according to the watercolor copy) to conform more to the style of Niccolò. Offner, Studies, 1327, 90 (there ample Literature). Berenson, Ital. pictures, 1932, 395 (as Niccolò Gerini).

(33) From Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XXIX identified as Scenes of Peter-Martyr; similarly, Ill. For. 1839, 45. – 1777 cleaned by Santi Paccini; subsequent restoration 1841 through Ant. Marini (Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 205ff.). – Poggi, ibid., 206ff. (following Landini): formerly 18 scenes, 6 of those lost; likely before 1425.

(34) In the inscription under the fresco the year 1342 is named; but Del Migliore 1684, 80, Richa VII, 1758, 294, Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XXIX and Ill. For. IX, 1839, 45 read the date as 1352, so one must assume, this date was probably distorted through a restoration; see Passerini, Stab., 1853, 450ff. and Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 203ff. Metz advocates for the year 1342, Jb. Pr. KS. LIX, 1938, 123, Note 1. – The whole building in which the fresco is located was not erected before 1352.

35) Reproduced by Vincenzo Borghini in the Memorie e Notizie di Antichità (Ms. Biblioteca Nazionale, classe XXV, 551); see Ricci, Cento vedute di Firenze antica, 1906, table IX and text. Excerpt and explanation of the unfinished cathedral façade by Paatz, Werden und Wesen der Trecento-Architektur in Toskana, 1357, 147ff. and differently by Metz, Jb. pr. KS. LIX, 1938, 122. About the building from S. Pier Scheraggio see Riv. D’A. XVI, 1934, 7. Note 1.

36) Document by Passerini, Stab., 1853, 453 and Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 226. – Removed 1698 (see “Building History”). The representation of the Bigallo on the fresco of Niccolò di Pietro Gerini and Ambrogio di Baldese (now in the Sala del Consiglio) and on the Predella of the high altar by Rid. Del Ghirlandaio unanimously reproduce the grid as a simple network of crossed iron rods. It was cut into rectangular doors; in the arches, the network rested on a crossbeam.

37) Document by Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 229.

38) The position of this fresco is not determined exactly; Del Migliore 1684, 80 saw it, “sopra al portone del Ricetto”, Richa VII, 1758, 293 simply says “sopra al portone”; most likely one could expect it on the now-free side that faces them campanile. Admittedly Poggi assumed (see the next note) the lost third Peter Martyr fresco, the origins of which we can not necessarily be certain, was also constructed there. Further literature in Note 32.

39) Outside of the two preserved frescos of this painter (see under “Facilities”) a third is named in a document (see Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 241); Poggi speculates that the lost fresco was located over the arcade on the east side. The document continues further, though not necessarily reliably, that this third fresco was completed.

40) Document, payment to Pietro Chellini 1443/44, by Rumohr, Ital. Forsch. II, 1827, 169ff. and Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 241; sourced from Rumohr, ibid. and Crowe-Cvalsaselle II, 1864, 518 on the scenes of the Peter Martyr legend on the norther façade; in contrast, see our Note 26 – Passerini, Cur. Stor. Art. 97 and Del Pretorio di Firenze, 1865, 9 presumed, that Chellini allegedly painted the decorative parts on the façade.

41) Document by Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 228.

42) Document by Passerini, Stab., 1853, 456 and Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 228: Nardo di Cione should paint “le volte e l’altre cose.”

43) Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XV: Passerini, Stab., 1853, 456, Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 202.

44) Document by Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 242; whether the work was executed is not clear; see Poggi, ibid., 196.

45) Document (contract) by Milanesi-Vasari I, 610/611 and Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 223/224; there also receipt for two payments 1416. – It is not clear, whether the picture was the high altar panel; it is not described in the literary sources, since the Bigallo crest appears in the pediment, will have been transferred from the Bigallo confraternity into the new residence in 1425; mentioned in the inventory of 1453 and 1576; From van Marle IX, 1927, 209, 215f. and Berenson, Dedalo XI, 2, 1930/31, identified as from 1296 with an image now located in an American private collection (Figure in Berenson, ibid., 1307).

46) Vasari VI, 538; described in detail by Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVII/XVIII; older literature in Note 29; see also Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 197.

47) Richa VIII, 1758, 284; Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVI; Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 197.

48) Del Migliore, 1684, 79; Richa VII, 1758, 287/288, reconstruction of engraving on page 252; Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XIII; Ill. For. IV, 1839, 29 (the image was previously located in the oratory on the gospel side, so on the south wall). – The epigraph from Richa ibid., Ill. fior. ibid., Passerini, Stab. 1853, 6f.; Ricci, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 221; see also Forschungen z. G. Florenz IV, 1908, 427.

49) Venturi, Storia V, 1907, 462 Note: giottesk; van Marle III, 1924, 403/404: Emulation of Bern. Daddi; Berenson, Ital. pictures, 1932, 274: late work of Jacopo di Cione.

50) Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XXIX; Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 206.

51) Milanesi-Vasari I, 643 Note 2; Poggi, Riv. D’A. II, 1904, 198, 238f.

Bigallo I

Baugeschichte

Die Compagnia della Misericordia, eine mildtätige Bruderschaft (4), erwarb 1321 ein Haus an der Südseite der Piazza del Duomo, dem Portal des Baptisteriums gegenüber (5). Nachdem ihr Besitz durch die Schenkung des angrenzenden Grundstückes (an der Ecke der Via de’Calzaiuoli) im Jahre 1351 vergrößert worden war (6), begann man 1352 mit der Errichtung eines Baues, der eine Loggia, ein Oratorium, Versammlungs- und Wohnräume für die Mitglieder der Bruderschaft enthalten sollte (7). 1358 war der Bau bereits voll­endet (8). Als Architekt kann mit großer Wahrscheinlichkeit Alberto Arnoldi bezeichnet werden, der auch die wichtigsten Teile der plasti­schen Ausstattung lieferte (9).

Im Jahre 1425 wurde auf Veranlassung Cosimos de’ Medici die ursprünglich an anderer Stelle ansässige Bruderschaft von S. Maria del Bigallo mit der Compagnia della Misericordia vereinigt, indem sie zugleich die Residenz der letzteren zum Mitbesitz erhielt (10). Bauliche Veränderungen wurden damals offenbar nicht vorgenommen. - Ein Brand im Jahre 1442 beschädigte nur das obere Stockwerk des Gebäudes (11). 1452 wurde die “Udienza” durch Einbeziehung eines neuen Raumes erweitert (12). Seit dem 17. Jahrhundert wurden mehrfach entstellende Veränderungen am Bau vorgenommen. 1698 wurden die Arkaden der Loggia und die Fenster im Obergeschoß vermauert (13). Nach der Auflösung der Bigallo-Behörde im Jahre 1776 diente das Gebäude als Sitz der Verwaltung eines staatlichen Waisenhauses und wurde aus diesem Anlaß verständnislos restau­riert (14). 1865 entfernte man die Mauern aus den Arkaden der Loggia und restaurierte das Innere des Oratoriums (15). 1882 wurden dann auch die vermauerten Fenster des Obergeschosses wieder ge­öffnet (16) ; eine letzte Restaurierung fand 1904 statt (17).

Baubeschreibung

Alte Darstellungen: auf dem Fresko des Niccolò di Pietro Gerini, Rückgabe verlorener Kinder, Sala del Consiglio; auf der Predella des Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio, Hochaltar; beides im Bigallo selbst (vgl. unter Ausstattung). - Kodex des Marco di Bartolommeo Rustichi, Mitte 15. Jahrhundert (Photo Soprintendenza 7646). - Stadtansicht des Stefano Bonsignori von 1584, Abb. bei Mori-Boffito, Piante e vedute di Firenze, 1926. – Zeichnung des E. Burci (vor 1865), Außenansicht mit vermauerter Loggia und ebensolchen Fenstern; Abb. in Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 244.

Bauaufnahmen: Aufriß-Stich von D. Cellesi in Rohault de Fleury, La Toscane au Moyenage, 1876.

Außen

Das Gebäude lehnt sich nach Süden und Westen an die Nachbarhäuser an. Seine Nordfassade umfaßt drei Wandfelder, die östliche eines. Dieses und das östliche Feld der Nordseite sind zu einer quadratischen Loggia ausgestaltet, die als Ausstellungsraum für Findelkinder diente. Die zwei rundbogigen Öffnungen dieser Vorhalle werden durch zweigeschossige Pilasterpaare und ein Gesims gerahmt; ein entsprchendes System, zweigeschossige Pilaster und Rundbögen, ist den zwei restlichen Jochen der Nordwand vorgeblendet (18). Von diesen beiden Jochen enthält das an die Loggia anschließende ein Spitzbogenportal mit breitem Architrav und gequaderter Rahmung; das letzte Joch enthält ein Rundbogenfenster (19).

Über dem Erdgeschoß folgt ein nur von Pilastern gegliedertes Zwischengeschoß, das dem plastischen und malerischen Schmuck vorbehalten blieb.

Auch das Obergeschoß ist durch Pilaster gegliedert: an der Nordwand hat es drei Felder, an der Ostwand eines; jedes dieser Felder enthäßlt en durch einen Rundbogen zusammengefaßtes Biforienfenster. Auf den Pilastern, die in Kämpferhöhe der Fenster durch ein Gesims verbunden sind, sitzen reich geschnitzte, mit Voluten versehene Tragbalken auf, die das weitvorstehende Sparrendach stützen,

Die Loggia.

Von Alberto Arnoldi (vgl. unter Baugeschichte). Ein Glanzstück des üppigen dekorativen Stils, den Andrea Orcagna an seinem berühmten Tabernakel in Or San Michele ausgebildet hatte. Alberto Arnoldi, gleich Orcagna ein Bildhauer-Baumeister, hat Orcagnas Stil noch während dessen Entstehung aufgenommen. – Die Pfeiler erheben sich auf einer Sockelbank, deren Marmorplatten lebhaft profilierte Vierpässe enthalten; in den Arkadenöffnung folgt noch je eine etwa quadratische Marmorplatte mit einer Rosette in durchbrochener Arbeit. Mit Vierpässen sind auch die äußeren Pilasterpaare geschmückt; an den inneren Pilastern und den Bögen sind die Vierpässe etwa größer und enthalten Halbfiguren (vgl. Ausstattung). – in der Laibung der Arkaden stehen gedrehte, mit Laubwerk ornamentierte Säulen, die sich in der Archivolte als gedrehter Rundstab fortsetzen. – Die flachen Pilaster neben den Bögen sind mit Profilbändern ornamentiert; an ihren Ansatzpunkten befinden sich flache Konsolen mit Laubwerk (20).

Das Innere der Loggia ist schlichter; in Höhe der Sockelbank verläuft ein feines Gesims, das sich auch über die Wandpfeiler hinzieht. Zwischen diesen befinden sich breite Nischen, deren Laibungen mit Spitzbogenblenden geschlossen; der zwischen diesen Bögen und dem spitzbogigen Kreuzrippengewölbe entstehende Zwickel ist mit je einem ornamentalen Kreit gefüllt.

Innen.

Das Oratorium gehört zum seltenen Typus der gewölbten gotischen Saalkirchen; vgl. S. Jacopo in Campo Corboloni (1311 ff.), S. Martino della Scala (1317 ff.) und S. Carlo Borromeo I (1342ff.). Es wird von zwei spitzbogigen Kreuzrippengewölben überdeckt, die auf breiten und flachen, von abgekanteten Ecksäulen begleiteten Pilastern auflagern. Das Rundfenster in der Nordwand wurde 1865 erweitert; gleichzeitig wure die Arkade zur Loggia hin verglast.

Ausstattung

Außen

Allgemeines. Die plastiche Dekoratin konzentriert sich auf die Vorhalle, die von dem Baumesiter Alberto Arnoldi, selbst einem Bildhauer, zu einem wahren Glanzstück gotischer Baudekoration ausgestaltet wurde, wie es im florentinischen Trecento nicht viele gibt (1352-58, vgl. Baugeschichte). Die Ausführung ist oft etwas derb, gewiß waren Gehilfenhände beteiligt. Die sehr bedeutende Er­findung aber beruht auf einem im Grunde antikischen Geschmack der aus einem gotischen Programm und überkommenen gotischen Formen etwas Selbständiges zu gestalten wußte.

Vorhalle. In den Vierpässen der inneren Pilasterpaare und der Bögen Halbfiguren; an der Ostseite acht Propheten, im Scheitel der Arkade der Schmerzensmann; an der Nordseite acht Engel und der Salvator. - In den Zwickeln der Arkaden: die vier Kardinaltugenden; an der Nordseite Gerechtigkeit und Tapferkeit, an der Ostseite Klugheit und Mäßigung (21).

Im Innern der Loggia sind an den Laibungen der Nischen, dicht über dem Gesims, vier Paare von Masken mit Blattwerk angebracht, offenbar von anderer Hand als die übrige Bauplastik.

Obergeschoß an der Nordseite. Über der Loggia halblebensgroße Steinfiguren, Madonna mit Kind, die Hlg. Petrus Martyr und Lucia; florentinisch, 2. Hälfte 14. Jahrhundert (22). Die drei Baldachine 1413 von Filippo di Cristofano hinzugefügt (23). - Zwischen den Baldachinen Fresken, anbetende Engel, um 1425 {24). - Im mittleren Joch Halbfigur der Madonna mit Kind von Alberto Arnoldi, 1361 (25). - Über den Blendarkaden der beiden westlichen Joche Fresken, Petrus Martyr überreicht Standarten an zwölf Mitglieder der Compagnia della Misericordia; Wunder bei der Predigt des Petrus Martyr; von Ventura di Moro und Rossello di Jacopo Franchi, 1445/46; sehr zerstört und 1882 von Gaetano Bianchi restauriert (26). Die übrige Bemalung - Ornamente und Figuren in Vierpässen - stammt von den Restaurierungen des 19. Jahrhunderts.

Innen

Oratorium

Hochaltar Geschnitztes Tabernakel: drei Nischen, die mittlere überhöht, von zwei Säulen flankiert und von einem breiten Architrav und Rundgiebel bekrönt; von Nofero d’Antonio Noferi, 1515, vergoldet von Bernardo di Jacopo und Zanobi di Lorenzo (27). Darin drei Statuen (Marmor), Madonna mit Kind und zwei leuchterhaltende Engel, von Alberto Arnoldi, 1359-1364 (28). - Gemalte Predella: Ermordung des hlg. Petrus Martyr, Geburt Christi, Schutzmantelmadonna, Flucht nach Ägypten, zwei Männer tragen einen Leichnam (im Hintergrund Ansicht des Bigallo); von Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio, 1515 (29).

Glasmalerei im Rundfenster der Nordwand, Caritas, um 1865 (30).

Sala del Consiglio

(Eingang Piazza di S. Giovanni Nr. 1)

Holztür mit Intarsia (Wappen der Bigallo-Bruderschaft und Ornamente), 15. Jahrhundert (31).

Südwand. Abgenommenes Fresko: die Vorsteher geben Kinder, die sich verlaufen haben, ihren Eltern zurück; von Niccolò di Pietro Gerini und Ambrogio di Baldese, 1386. Ursprünglich an der Fassade; 1777 abgenommen und verstümmelt (Inschrift unter dem Fresko) (32).

Ostwand. Fresken, zwölf Szenen aus der Tobiaslegende, 1. Viertel des 15. Jahrhunderts (33). - Beschreibung von links nach rechts, oben beginnend:

  1. Tobias und sein Sohn mit einer Gruppe von Reitern vor einer Stadt.
  2. Bankett des Tobias; sein Sohn berichtet, er habe den Leichnam eines Israeliten gefunden; Tobias verläßt das Mahl.
  3. Der blinde Tobias.
  4. Tobias schickt seinen Sohn auf die Reise.
  5. Hochzeit des jungen Tobias mit Sarah.
  6. Hochzeitsmahl.
  7. Der Erzengel Raffael treibt an Stelle des jungen Tobias die Schuld bei Gabael ein.
  8. Raffael kehrt zum Hochzeitsmahl zurück.
  9. Heimreise des jungen Tobias.
  10. Der Hund zeigt seine Rückkehr an.
  11. Heimkehr.
  12. Bankett im Hause des Tobias.

Über sechs weitere Szenen vgl. Verlorene Ausstattung.

Westwand Fresko, Misericordia, 1352 (?) (34). Große stehende Figur; auf dem Mantel Medaillons mit Sprüchen und kleinen Szenen (Werke der Barmherzigkeit). Nehen der Figur Sprüche, die das Wirken der Misericordia betreffen. Zu Füßen knieende Figuren jeden Alters und Standes und eine Ansicht von Florenz, die frühste bekannte Dar­stellung der Stadt (35).

Die Räume des Obergeschosses sind modernisiert und als Museum eingerichtet. Beschreibendes Verzeichnis in Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 203-225.

Verlorene Ausstattung

Außen

Loggia. Gitter von dem Sienesen Francesco Petrucci, 1358; verloren (36).

Nordseite. Tabernakel für die Madonnenfigur über dem Portal, von Bonaiuto di Lando, 1387; bemalt von Amhrogio di Baldese; verloren (37).

Ostseite. Über der Arkade der Loggia (?) (38) Fresko, die Vorsteher geben Kinder, die sich verlaufen haben, ihren Eltern zurück; von Niccolò di Pietro Gerini und Ambrogio di Baldese, 1386; jetzt in der Sala del Consiglio, vgl. dort.

An unbestimmtem Ort. Fresko, Geschichte des hlg. Petrus Martyr; von Ventura di Moro und Rossello di Jacopo Franchi, 1445/46; verloren (39). - Fresken von Pietro Chellini, 1444; verloren (40). - Malereien am Dach, von einem Ma1er Bartolommeo, 1361; verloren (41).

Innen

Oratorium

Gewölbefresken (vielleicht auch Fresken an den Seitenwänden) von Nardo di Cione, 1363 (42); zerstört oder übermalt 1760. - Zweite Frekendekoration, 1760, Gewölbe und Seitenwände von Stefano Fabbrini bemalt; wohl 1865 übertüncht (43). - Glasfenster von Stefano di Biagio dei Mezzi, 1454; verloren (44).

Erste Hochaltartafel (?): Madonna mit Johannes d. T. und dem hlg. Petrus Martyr; im Giebel Christus, die Verkündigung und das Wappen der Bigallo-Bruderschaft, in der Predella Beweinung Christi und je eine Szene aus der Legende Johannes d. T. und des Petrus Martyr; von Mariotto di Nardo, 1415/16; vielleicht 1515 bei Errichtung des heutigen Tabernakels entfernt; Hauptbild jetzt in amerikanischem Privatbesitz, Predella verschollen (45).

Zweite, untere Predella des Altartabernakels von 1515, drei größere und vier kleinere Bilder:

  1. Raffael mit Tobias.
  2. Knieende Madonna und Gottvater von Engeln verehrt, daneben Adam und Eva (Conceptio Immacolata?)
  3. Schreibende Frau (Sibylle?)
  4. und 5. Sibyllen.
  5. Verkündigung.
  6. Himmelfahrt Mariae. Von Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio, 1515; verschollen (46).

Tabernakel, das am Fest des hlg. Petrus Martyr im Oratorium ausgestellt wurde; Holz, geschnitzt von Antonio Carota (?). Auf den bemalten Flügeln innen Johannes d. T. und Tobias, außen die Wappen der Misericordia und des Bigallo; von Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio, 1510; im Innern des Tabernakels ein Bronzerelief des hlg. Petrus Martyr, auf einem Sockelrelief sein Martyrium. Verkauft 1786; verschollen (47).

Tafel, der hlg. Petrus Martyr überreicht den Capitani della Fede Standarten; im Giebel die Madonna zwischen den Hlg. Franz und Dominikus; auf der Rückseite im Giebel Christus auf dem Grab, darunter eine Inschrift, die sich auf die Gründung der Compagnia bezieht (48); dem Jacopo di Cione zugeschrieben, letztes Viertel des 14. Jahrhunderts; jetzt im Museum des Bigallo (49).

Sala del Consiglio

Ostwand. Sechs Fresken mit Szenen aus der Tobias-Legende, erstes Viertel des 15. Jahrhunderts, zugehörig zu den vorhandenen (vgl. unter Ausstattung); verschollen (50).

An unbestimmtem Ort

Fresko oder Tafelbild der Verkündigung, von Agnolo Gaddi, 1380, mit Bildnis des Stifters Giov. Buccheri; verschollen oder verloren (5l). Über weitere verlorene Ausstattungsgegenstände, deren ursprünglicher Platz heute nicht mehr zu bestimmen ist, vgl. die Dokumente bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 225ff., 238ff.

Anmerkungen

(1) So hieß das Gebaude, bevor die Compagnia del Bigallo 1425 den Mitbesitz erhielt; vgl. Baugeschichte.

(2) Del Migliore 1684, 75.

(3) Richa VII, 1758, 251. - Der Name Bigallo ist angeblich von einem Hospital dieses Namens bei Ruballa (spedale di S. Maria a Fonteviva, genannt del Bigallo), das der Compagnia Maggiore della Vergine gehörte, zunächst auf diese und dann auf ihre Residenz übertragen worden; vgl. Richa VII, 1758, 255; Forschungen z. G. Florenz IV, 1908, 426ff. und Geschichte von Florenz II, 1908, 294ff.

(4) Die Geschichte der Compagnia della Misericordia ist oft falsch dargestellt worden, da man sie mit der - bis 1425 gesondert existierenden - Compagnia del Bigallo verwechselte. Die Compagnia della Misericordia wird erst 1321 urkundlich erwähnt (vgl. die folgende Anm.). Nach dem “Liber Chronicorum” des hlg. Antonin (ed. Giunti 1586, T. III, Parte III, Cap. VII, P· 233) wäre sie aus der 1292 gegründeten Laudesi-Bruderschaft von Or San Michele hervorgegangen; vgl. Passerini, Stab., 1853, 446f., der irrtüm­lich annahm, die Compagnia werde erst 1329 zuerst erwähnt. - Andere, legendäre Gründungsgeschichten im Ill. fior. 1847, 49 ff. und bei Passerini, Stab., 1853, 440ff. erwähnt.

(5) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 194 Anm., nach den Spogli Strozz. - Richa VII, 1758, 268 datiert den Ankauf dieses früber dem Baldinuccio Adimari gehörenden Hauses summarisch “um 1340”.

(6) Dokument vom 16. 9. 1351 bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 225/226; vgl. auch Passerini, Stab., 1853, 448.

(7) Dokument vom 28. 1. 1352 (Baubeginn) bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 226; ungenau bei Passerini, Stab., 1853, 449/450.

(8) In diesem Jahr sind die Gitter der Loggia bereits hergestellt; Dokument bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 226.

(9) Vasari I, 302 nennt als Erbauer Niccolò Pisano; ihm folgte Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XIII. Dagegen wandte sich Passerini, Stab., 1853, 449-450 mit dem Hinweis auf den chronologischen Widerspruch; er glaubte, Andrea Orcagna sei der Architekt. Burckhardt, Cicerone, 1860, 145 dachte an einen Nachfolger des Orcagna. Frey, Loggia de’Lanzi, 1885, 105 erwog umgekehrt die Mölglichkeit, daß Orcagna von der Architektur des Bigallo beeinflußt worden sei (Tabernakel in Or San Michele). Frey glaubte auch, ältere Be­standteile aus dem Bau ausscheiden zu können; die Gliederung der beiden westlichen Arkaden und Pilaster erinnerte ihn an ähnliche Bauteile in S. Maria Novella und S. Croce, und so kam er zu der Vermutung, dies seien Reste eines alten Oratoriums, das vielleicht von Arnolfo di Cambio erbaut worden sei (Frey a. a. 0. 86, 105). Dagegen wandte Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 193/194 mit Recht ein, daß die Bruderschaft sich erst 1321 an dieser Stelle niedergelassen habe (vgl. Anm. 5), und daß außerdem der Baufund keine Ausscheidung älterer Teile zulasse. Auch Poggi vertritt die zuerst von Frey vor­getragene Ansicht, daß Alberto Arnoldi der Erbauer sei. - Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 684: von Arnoldi unter dem Einfluß Orcagnas; Thieme-Becker I, 1907, 218: ebenso. L. Beccherucci, Arte XXX, 1927, 214: Arnoldi der Architekt der Bigallo-Loggia.

(10) Del Migliore 1684, 78; Richa VII, 1758, 267/268 nach einer Schrift des 17. Jahrh.; Ill. fior. IV, 1839, 32; Passerini, Stab., 1853, 797; Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 192, 195. - In Forschungen z. G. Florenz IV, 1908, 427 fälschlich das Datum 1452.

(11) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 197.

(12) Dok. bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 196.

(13) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 201 nach einem zeitgenössischen Diarium. - Dieser Zustand ist beschrieben von Landini, Bigallo 1779, XIV und wiedergegeben auf einer Zeichnung des E. Burci, Abb. bei Poggi a. a. 0. 244.

(14) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 202.

(15) Passerini, Cur. stor. art. 91; Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 202; die Arbeiten wurden von Mariano Falcini geleitet.

(16) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 202.

(17) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 202; A. e st. XXIII, 1904, 155.

(18) Als Vorstufe dieses Systems vgl. S. Giovannino dei Cavalieri.

(19) Das Fenster wurde 1865 erweitert; vgl. Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 196.

(20) Es ist ungewiß, ob darauf Figuren stehen sollten.

(21) Die plastische Ausschmückung wurde zuerst von Frey, Loggia de’Lanzi 1885, 105 dem Alberto Arnoldi zugeschrieben; Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 193 vermutet - gewiß mit Recht -, daß auch Gehilfen daran beteiligt waren. Vgl. ferner M. Reymond, Gaz. B. A. II, 1893, 322 und La sculpture florentine, 1897, I, 170f.; Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 684; Thieme-Becker I, 1907, 218.

(22) Die drei Statuen stammen von dem alten Oratorium der Bigallo­ Bruderschaft (vgl. Bigallo II) und wurden 1425 hierher übertragen. Sie waren 1392 von Ambrogio di Baldese bemalt worden, vgl. Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 230/231 (Dok.) und 192/193. - Von Vasari I, 302 dem Niccolò Pisano zugeschrieben; so auch Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XIII; Milanesi-Vasari I, 302 brachte die Statuen irrtümlich mit dokumentarisch erwähnten Arbeiten des Filippo di Cristofano (1413) in Verbindung (vgl. nächste Anm.); so auch Swarzenski, Kuntsgesch. Anz. III, 1906, 15 und Vitzthum-Volbach, Die Malerei und Plastik des Mittelalters in Italien, 1924, 165. - Reymond, La sculpture florentine I, 1897, 171: sie erinnern an den Stil des Nino Pisano. Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 522: Schule des Niccolò Pisano.

(23) Dokumente bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 230/231.

(24) Wohl anläßlich der Aufstellung der Figuren 1425 gemalt (vgl. Anm. 22); sehr restauriert.

(25) Dokumente bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 228; vgl. auch Supino ebd. S. 213. - Del Migliore 1684, 81: Andrea Pisano; Landini, Bigallo, 1779. XIV; Passerini, Stab., 1853, 455; Frey, Loggia de’Lanzi, 1885, 105; Reymond, Lavsculpture fiorentine I, 1897, 151, l70f.; Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 684; Valentiner, Art in Am. XVI, 1928, 269.

(26) Dokumente bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 241/ 242: Auftrag 1445; Abschätzung 1446 durch Ghiberti und Buonaiuti di Giovanni. - Del Migliore 1684, 81; Richa VII, 1758, 252, 285 (angeblich von Taddeo Gaddi); falsche Identifizierung mit Arbeiten des Pietro Chellini (vgl. Verl. Ausstattung) bei Rumohr, Ital. Forsch. II, 1827, 169ff., Crowe-Cavalcaselle 11, 1864, 519 und A. e st. XXIII, 1904, 155; dagegen schon Passerini, Cur. stor. art. 97 und Del Pretorio di Firenze, 1865, 9. - Venturi, Storia VII 1, 1911, 22; Thieme-Becker XII, 1916, 315. - Über die Restaurierung vgl. Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 203.

(27) Dokumente bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 228. - Von Vasari I, 485 fälschlich dem Antonio Carota zugeschrieben; so auch Del Migliore 1684, 81, Richa VII, 1758, 283, Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVI; richtiggestellt von Milanesi-Vasari I, 485.

(28) Dokumente bei Passerini, Stab., 1853 453/454 und Poggi Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 226-228; Auftrag 1359, Schlußzahlung 1364. - Vasari I, 485: von Andrea Pisano; so noch Del Migliore 1684, 81, Richa VII, 178, 282, und Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVI; vgl. auch Supino, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 212/213; Venturi, Storia IV, 1906, 683f., 686; Thieme-Becker I, 1907, 218; Vitzthum-Volhach, Die Malerei und Plastik des Mittelalters in Italien, 1924 171; Valentiner, Art in Am. XVI, 1928, 269.

(29) Dokumente bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 230. - Vasari VII, 358: Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio; ebenso Del Migliore, 1684, 81 und Richa VII, 1758, 283; Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVII: von einem Sohn des Dom. Girhlandaio. - Thieme-Becker XIII, 1920, 562 (als Ridolfo); ebenso Venturi, Storia IX, 1, 1925, 512; Berenson, Ital. pictures, 1931, 227: Ridolfo Ghirlandaio (?).

(30) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 186.

(31) Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 204. Wackernagel, Der Lebensraum des Künstlers in der Florentinischen Renaissance, 1938, 169.

(32) Dokumente bei Passerini, Stab., 1853, 456/457 und Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 229; über die frühere Anbringung des Freskos vgl. Verl. Ausstattung, Außen, und Anm. 38. Eine Aquarellkopie, die das Fresko vor der 1777 erfolgten Verstümmelung zeigt, bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 209, Abb. 4. - Del Migliore, 1684, 80; Richa VII, 1758, 293 bezog auf dieses Fresko fälschlich ein Dokument von 1444. - Poggi a. a. O. 208f.; Sirèn, Burl. Mag. 1909, 325 und Thieme-Becker XIII, 1920, 465: hauptsächlich von A. di Baldese; auch van Marle III, 1924, 612, 617: die erhaltenen Teile haben kaum Beziehungen zu Niccolò di Pietro Gerini und werden wohl von Amhrogio di Baldese stammen; die nicht mehr erhaltenen Teile scheinen (nach der Aquarellkopiere) der Art des Niccolò mehr entsprochen zu haben. Offner, Studies, 1327, 90 (dort weitere Literatur). Berenson, Ital· pictures, 1932, 395 (als Niccolò Gerini). .

(33) Von Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XXIX als Petrus Martyr-Szenen bezeichnet; ähnlich Ill. fior. 1839, 45. - 1777 gereinigt von Santi Paccini; erneute Restaurierung 1841 durch Ant. Marini (Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 206ff.). - Poggi, a. a. 0. 206:ff. (im Anschluß an Landini): ehemals l8 Szenen, 6 davon verloren; wohl vor 1425.

(34) In der Inschrift unter dem Fresko wird das Jahr 1342 genannt; aber Del Migliore 1684, 80, Richa VII, 1758, 294, Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XXIX und Ill. fior. IV, 1839, 45 lasen 1352, sodaß man vermuten muß, die heutige Zahl sei durch eine Restaurierung entstellt; vgl. Passerini, Stab., 1853, 450ff. und Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 203ff. Für 1342 tritt wieder ein Metz, Jb. pr. KS. LIX, 1938, 123, Anm. 1. - Der ganze Bau, in dem sich das Fresko befindet, wurde aber erst 1352ff. errichtet.

(35) Reproduziert von Vincenzo Borghini in den Memorie e Notizie di Antichità (Ms. Biblioteca Nazionale, classe XXV, 551); vgl. Ricci, Cento vedute di Firenze antica, 1906, Taf. IX und Text. Ausschnitt und Deutung der unfertigen Domfassade bei Paatz, Werden und Wesen der Trecento Architektur in Toskana, 1937, 147ff. und abweichend bei Metz, Jh. pr. KS. LIX, 1938, 122. Über den Bau von S. Pier Scheraggio vgl. Riv. d’A. XVI, 1934, 7. Anm. 1.

(36) Dokument bei Passerini, Stab., 1853, 453 und Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 226. - Entfernt 1698 (vgl. Baugeschichte). Die Darstellungen des Bigallo auf dem Fresko von Niccolò di Pietro Gerini und Amhrogio di Bal­dese (jetzt in der Sala del Consilglio) und auf der Predella des Hochaltares, von Rid. del Ghirlandaio, geben das Gitter übereinstimmend als einfaches Netzwerk aus gekreuzten Eisenstäben wieder. Es waren rechteckige Türen eingeschnitten; in den Bögen ruhte das Netzwerk auf einem Querbalken.

(37) Dokumente hei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 229.

(38) Die Lage dieses Freskos ist nicht genau zu ermitteln; Del Migliore 1684, 80 sah es “sopra al portone del Ricetto”, während Richa VII, 1758, 293 einfach sagt “sopra al portone”; am ehesten könnte man es an der jetzt freien Seite zum Campanile hin vermuten. Allerdings vermutet Poggi (vgl. die nächste Anm.) dort das verlorene dritte Petrus-Martyr-Fresko, von dem jedoch nicht unbedingt feststeht, daß es auch ausgeführt wurde. Weitere Literatur in Anm. 32.

(39) Außer den zwei erhaltenen Fresken dieser Maler (vgl. unter Ausstattung) wird in einem Dokument noch ein drittes genannt (vgl. Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 241); Poggi vermutet, das verlorene Fresko habe sich über der Arkade an der Ostseite befunden. Es geht aus dem Dokument nicht unbedingt sicher hervor, daß dieses dritte Fresko ausgeführt wurde.

(40) Dokumente, Zahlungen an Pietro Chellini 1443/44, bei Rumohr, Ital. Forsch. II, 1827, 169ff. und Poggi, Riv. d’A. II; 1904, 241; von Rumohr a. a. 0. und Crowe-Cavalcaselle II, 1864, 518 auf die Szenen aus der Petrus-Martyr-Legende an der Nordfassade bezogen; vgl. dagegen unsere Anm. 26.- Passerini, Cur. stor. art. 97 und Del Pretorio di Firenze, 1865, 9 vermutet, daß Chellini die dekorativen Teile an der Fassade gemalt habe.

(41) Dokument bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 228.

(42) Dokument bei Passerini, Stab., 1853, 456 und Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 228: Nardo di Cione soll “le volte e l’altre cose” bemalen.

(43) Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XV; Passerini, Stab., 1853, 456; Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 202.

(44) Dokument bei Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 242; ob die Arbeit ausgeführt wurde, ist nicht sicher; vgl. Poggi a. a. 0. 196.

(45) Dokument (Auftrag) bei Milanesi-Vasari I, 610/611 und Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 223/224; dort auch Beleg für zwei Zahlungen 1416. - Es ist nicht sicher, oh das Bild die Hochaltartafel war; es wird, da im Giebel das Bigallo-Wappen erscheint, von der Bigallo-Bruderschaft 1425 in die neue Residenz überführt worden sein; erwähnt im Inventar von 1453 und 1576, von der Quellenliteratur nicht beschriehen. - Von van Marle IX, 1927, 209, 215f. und Berenson, Dedalo XI, 2, 1930/31, 1296 mit einem jetzt in amerikanischem Privatbesitz befindlichen Bild identifiziert (Abb. bei Berenson a. a. 0. 1307).

(46) Vasari VI, 538; ausführlich beschrieben von Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVII/XVIII; ältere Lit. in Anm. 29; vgl. auch Poggi, Riv. d’A. I, 1904, 197.

(47) Richa VII, 1758, 284; Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XVI; Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 197.

(48) Del Migliore 1684, 76; Richa VII, 1758, 287/288, Stichabbildung bei S. 252; Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XIII; Ill fior. IV 1839, 29 (das Bild befand sich ehemals in Oratorium an der Evangelienseite, also an der Südwand). - Die Inschrift bei Richa a. a. 0., Ill. fior. a. a. 0., Passerini, Stab. 1853, 6f.; Ricci, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 221; vgl. auch Forschungen z. G. Florenz IV, 1908, 427.

(49) Venturi, Storia V, 1907, 462 Anm.: giottesk; van Marle III, 1924, 403/404: Nachfolge des Bern. Daddi; Berenson, Ital. pictures, Spätwerk des Jacopo di Cione.

(50) Landini, Bigallo, 1779, XXIX; Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 206.

(51) Milanesi-Vasari I, 643 Anm. 2; Poggi, Riv. d’A. II, 1904, 198, 238f.